Mizo Identity and Indianisation: A Case of Conflict Transformation in Mizoram

DOI10.1177/0019556120160322
AuthorJagadish K. Patnaik
Date01 July 2016
Publication Date01 July 2016
SubjectArticle
MIZO IDENTITY AND INDIANISATION: A CASE
OF
CONFLICT TRANSFORMATION
IN
MIZORAM
JAGADISH K. PATNAIK
This article examines the process
of
conflict transformation in
Mizoramfollowing the signing
of
the Peace Accord
in
1986.
First, the article examines the process
of
'Mizoisation', which
was responsible for bringing together all the diverse groups
and
elements inhabiting the Lushai hills
of
the erstwhile Lushai
district
of
the then Assam province. Second, it examines
whether Mizoisation has been complementary to the process
of
'Indianisation
'.
Although
the process
of
Indianisation
started
as
early as the colonial times, the project
of
national
integration after Independence
faced
numerous challenges
to the extent
of
interrogating the efficacy
of
the Indian state.
Thirdly, the article examines the Mizoisation process
by
using the conceptual tool
of
conflict transformation. Conflict
transformation
is
a process
of
change
in
the relationship and the
discourse
of
conflict into the constructivist domain
to
redefine
issues
of
identity
and
sharing the power structure to the well-
being
of
the community. Fourthly, the author interprets the
process
of
conflict transformation in the context
of
the post-
Accord developments in Mizoram. In the concluding section,
he argues that the process
of
Mizoisation
is
complementary
to the process
of
Indianisation that was ushered
in
intensely
since Independence.
THE
STATE
ofMizoram parades a picture
of
peace and serenity presently, and
has been celebrating the state's birth anniversary every year with traditional
gaiety and fervour. The peace following the signing
of
the Peace Accord
( 1986), however, has been the consequence
of
conflict transformation in the
state through identity formation. In fact, the issue
of
identity formation and
development
of
Mizo culture are so intertwined that it has now animated
the public discourse in the state. In the North-East India (NEI), most
of
the
ethnic-based identity formations do emanate from the post-colonial nation
building project undertaken by Indian state. The efforts for inclusion and

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