Environmental Standards in the BRICS: An Analysis of Vehicular Pollution

Publication Date01 July 2021
Date01 July 2021
DOI10.1177/00208817211028053
AuthorKrishnendra Meena
SubjectResearch Articles
https://doi.org/10.1177/00208817211028053
International Studies
58(3) 397 –408 2021
© 2021 Jawaharlal Nehru University
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DOI: 10.1177/00208817211028053
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Research article
Environmental Standards
in the BRICS: An Analysis
of Vehicular Pollution
Krishnendra Meena1
Abstract
Since its inception, the BRICS has received attention as a geopolitical challenger
to the already established institutions of the Global North. BRICS members have
also been vocal on issues concerning global environment. Brazil, India, China
and South Africa have raised important issues at international conferences on
Climate Change. The article looks at the specific issue of vehicular pollution in
the BRICS countries. Vehicular pollution standards already in existence through
the United Nations Environment Programme and the most cited and practised
standards of the European Union remain the yardstick to be followed around
the world. The article looks at the standards set up by the individual BRICS
countries. Subsequently efforts of the BRICS as a group are explored through
their joint statements. The article argues that despite important players in global
vehicle market, the BRICS as a grouping has not been able to formulate any viable
alternative standards for vehicular emissions.
Keywords
BRICS, environment, vehicular pollution, standards
Introduction
Globally, guidelines for environmental and social standards have been formulated
by international organizations including the United Nations Environment
Programme (UNEP), the European Union (EU) and others. However, “as authority
over environmental policy moved increasingly from domestic to international
settings, perceptions that decision-making is insufficiently democratic would
1 Centre for International Politics, Organization and Disarmament, School of International Studies,
Jawaharlal Nehru University, New Delhi, India.
Corresponding author:
Krishnendra Meena, Associate Professor, Centre for International Politics, Organization and
Disarmament, School of International Studies, Jawaharlal Nehru University, New Mehrauli Road,
New Delhi 110067, India.
E-mail: meena.krishnendra@gmail.com

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