Alternative Development Strategy in North-East India: A Case Study of Manipur

Published date01 July 2016
Date01 July 2016
DOI10.1177/0019556120160321
ALTERNATIVE DEVELOPMENT STRATEGY IN
NORTH-EAST INDIA: A CASE STUDY OF MANIPUR
SURENDRA KUMAR
The lopsided development process in Manipur has
led
to
vast
inequalities
and
under-development. The process
of
development planning in the state
is
adopted without analysing
the suitability, mindset
and
culture
of
the people
of
the area.
Hence, there
is
a need
to
adopt a new strategy
of
development
in
Manipur. This strategy will aim at satisfying needs
and
requirements
of
the people and attaining sustainable growth
in
the state.
The
mindset
of
the people needs to be prepared for this
approach and peoples cooperation needs
to
be sought. Resorting
to natural resource systems and improving natural resource
management practices are
key
to
development
of
the state.
INTRODUCTION
MANIPUR WAS an independent princely state till the Anglo-Manipur
War
of
1891. Till 194 7, it was under the British rule.
It
was merged with
the Indian Union on October 15, 1949. Between 1949 and 1966, it was
a Part-C centrally administered area and between 1966 and 1972, it was
a Union Territory.1 Only after the Fifth Five-Year Plan, Manipur could
undertake developmental planning as a full-fledged state
oflndia.
The rest
of
the Indian states had by then achieved 20 years
of
development through
the first four Five-Year Plans. Thus, during the initial phases
of
planning
process, there was no meaningful development
in
Manipur. The purpose
of
this article is to address the issue
of
development
of
Manipur through
alternative strategy.
It
will also analyse the indigenous knowledge systems
applied by the people on the use
of
their natural resources.
The state
of
Manipur is located in a tri-junction zone
of
mainland
Indian sub-continental zone, the Himalayan and the Trans-Himalayan zones
and the Indo-Malayan zone. A wide range
of
natural heritage including
rare and endemic species
of
flora and fauna is visible in the state. The
richness in natural resources is the product
of
its geographical location and
peculiar topographic exposition
of
drainage patterns and wetlands systems.

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